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Tablet PCs in Medicine

 
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PostPosted: Fri Feb 21, 2003 8:05 pm    Post subject: Tablet PCs in Medicine Reply with quote

Israeli start-up helps patients get right medications

By Yuval Dror


Every year, some 7,000 patients die in hospitals in the United States as a result of mistakes in their treatment by the medical staff. This alarming finding was published four years ago in one of the American medical journals and prompted the American health system to seek ways to prevent errors occuring in the treatments given to hospital patients.

The Israeli start-up company, MDG Medical, thinks it has found the solution, at least to one aspect of the problem - the distribution of medications.

"In Israeli hospitals, the medical staff conducts daily visits to all the patients and the senior physician writes a list of medications that each patient is to receive," explains MDG CEO Dr. Gilead Asseo. "The nurses try to understand the doctors' handwriting, which is not always particularly clear, and copy the orders into the orders book. The orders are then copied again into the medications book.

"At this point, the head nurse of the ward goes to the medicine cabinet and begins taking out the required drugs. She then puts each dose of medicine in a cup and labels each cup with the name of the medication. The drugs are distributed from a wobbly tea cart. At best, the patient does not receive his medication; at worst, he gets the wrong medication."

Asseo is a surgeon by profession and recalls that in 1961, there were 600 drugs on the hospitals' lists. Today, there are close to 25,000. "The doctor cannot remember them all, even if he wants to; he needs a computer to help him."

Sources at MDG say it is no wonder that so many patients are harmed by taking the wrong drugs when there are so many opportunities for errors in the drug distribution process. This is why the company developed a closed system that its developer, Dr. Bat-Ami Sadan, claims will computerize one of the hospitals' most exhausting processes.

The system is based on a tablet PC and includes a program for recording the names of all the patients in a ward, the medications they are to be given, and how the drugs are to be administered.

The doctors enter all the orders, including how often each drug is to be given, while the second stage of the system involves connecting the tablet PC to a central server that relays the orders to a computerized medicine cabinet, that has a drawer for each drug. When the nurse enters the patient's name on the cabinet's console, the appropriate drawers open automatically. The nurse then puts the drugs on a cart that is also computerized and has drawers for each patient, with the patient's name displayed on a small digital screen built into each drawer.

Thus, the nurse goes through the ward list, patient by patient, and fills up all the drawers. When she gives the medications to the patient, she has to type on the cart's keyboard that the patient has received the drug.

At this stage, MDG's system is undergoing field trials in the geriatric rehabilitation department of Sheba Hospital in Tel Hashomer. The trial is due to finish in April and Ichilov Hospital has already voiced an interest in the system.

Zvi Levinhar, MDG's marketing vice-president, says that Sheba plans to equip other departments of the hospital with the system. MDG has also signed a contract with Hammersmith Hospital in London and with BioEnterprise, an American company that was set up by medical centers in the Cleveland, Ohio area.

"We expect to sell 20-30 systems in 2003 and to reach profitability in 2006," says Levinhar.

Off the record, MDG says that the best case scenario would be if the company were to sell some 800 systems in Israel. An average system costs about $100,000. Sadan says that even though the hospital staff is hesitant about using technology, they know that they can no longer manage without it.

"The doctors recognize that the time has come. They know that they have to take advantage of the assistance that technology offers."

Till now, MDG has raised $2 million from the international LSKW investor group, which includes Ron Lauder, David Khalili and others who are represented in Israel by InQsoft, headed by Israel (Izzy) Tapoohi, a former Bezeq board chair and a former chair of the Africa-Israel investment group.

Tapoohi says that the group decided to invest in MDG after being convinced that there was a real market need for MDG's solution. "Many Israeli companies develop technology and then look for a market. In this case, the market is screaming for a solution, and we have it."

Tapoohi notes that the company didn't invent anything revolutionary. "The medical software exists; computerized cabinets have been used by the air force for years. What MDG did was to provide a closed system that uses these developments to meet the [market's] need," he explains.

Tapoohi added that the company would soon be embarking on a $6.5-million round of fund-raising, assisted by BioEnterprise. Asseo says that the fresh capital will go toward further development of the software, the carts and the cabinets, as well as the start of the marketing effort in the U.S., Europe and Israel.

http://www.haaretzdaily.com/hasen/pages/ShArt.jhtml?itemNo=264855&contrassID=2&subContrassID=2&sbSubContrassID=0&listSrc=Y




02/20/03

Database finds new home on Tablet PC

By Vandana Sinha
GCN Staff

The Tablet PC now has a health care database management system on its roster of software applications. InterSystems Corp. of Cambridge, Mass., has conformed its health DBMS, Caché, to wireless connectivity because of growing demand by hospital employees.

“We’re seeing increasing adoption of wireless applications in health care,” said Paul Grabscheid, InterSystems’ vice president of strategic planning. He cited the ease of wireless use for routines such as dispensing medications to a series of hospital rooms. InterSystems claims to have 65,000 Caché seats at the Defense Department.

The DBMS uses a caching protocol with built-in performance and recoverability measures. Caché runs under Compaq Tru64 Unix, Hewlett-Packard HP-UX, IBM AIX, Linux, Microsoft Windows, OpenVMS and Sun Solaris. A multiserver license is $450 on the Veterans Affairs Procurement of Computer Hardware and Software 2 contract.

http://216.70.54.91/vol1_no1/daily-updates/21178-1.html
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www.MedicalTabletPC.com
www.digital-doc.com

[url=http://www.digital-doc.com/C2/EMR.htm]TabletPCs in a Medical Environment[/url]

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PostPosted: Mon Feb 24, 2003 1:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://www.microsoft.com/presspass/press/2003/feb03/02-12HealthcareSupportsTabletPR.asp
Tablet PC Gains Widespread Support From Healthcare Industry
Designed to Improve Communications and Productivity for All Business Users, Microsoft Windows XP Tablet PC Edition Is Striking a Chord With Physicians and Health Professionals
SAN DIEGO -- Feb. 12, 2003 -- Months after its official launch, Microsoft® Windows® XP Tablet PC Edition continues to receive positive support within the healthcare industry, Microsoft Corp. today announced at the 2003 Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS) conference and exhibition in San Diego at the San Diego Convention Center. Across the healthcare industry, medical professionals, hospitals, pharmaceutical companies and healthcare software vendors are deploying the Tablet PC for its innovative benefits of unlimited mobility and versatility.


http://www.hp.com/hpinfo/newsroom/feature_stories/2003/03healthcare.html
by Troy Brown
Feb. 2003 -- HP's Compaq TC 1000 Tablet PC is garnering the attention of healthcare IT professionals and physicians across the United States who are looking to the future of healthcare.
"Healthcare professionals want technology that saves them time, money, makes their life easier and fits the way they work - not the other way around," said Ken Jarvis, director, healthcare solutions group, Enterprise Systems Group. "The TC1000 is the most versatile full-function Tablet PC on the market. It is a technology that is a great fit for the workflow in the healthcare environment."
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[url=http://www.digital-doc.com/C2/EMR.htm]TabletPCs in a Medical Environment[/url]

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PostPosted: Tue Feb 25, 2003 1:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The main IntegriMED software package is an advanced, fully integrated practice management and electronic medical records system. Through the IntegriMED wireless, mobile Tablet PC, the physicians at AdMed can access multiple systems within seconds. IntegriMED integrates individual systems and then delivers the software to physicians over the Internet using an application service provider (ASP) model.

http://www.businesswire.com/cgi-bin/cb_headline.cgi?&story_file=bw.022503/230565070&directory=/google&header_file=header.htm&footer_file=
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C.M.Wilkerson, D.C.
www.MedicalTabletPC.com
www.digital-doc.com

[url=http://www.digital-doc.com/C2/EMR.htm]TabletPCs in a Medical Environment[/url]

"Good software makes us think, good hardware and software, changes our lives."
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 07, 2003 7:00 am    Post subject: HIPA Compliant Sign in Sheet on a tabletpc Reply with quote

http://www.dailypress.com/business/local/dp-62055sy0mar06,0,2638556.story?coll=dp-business-localheads
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[url=http://www.digital-doc.com/C2/EMR.htm]TabletPCs in a Medical Environment[/url]

"Good software makes us think, good hardware and software, changes our lives."
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 12, 2003 9:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Allscripts started with the PPC and is now moving to the Tabletpc........

Press Release Source: Allscripts Healthcare Solutions


TouchWorks mEMR(TM) Featured in Intel(R) Centrino(TM) Mobile Technology Launch
Wednesday March 12, 9:15 am ET
Live Demo via Satellite From Cheshire Medical Center/Dartmouth-Hitchcock Keene During Keynote Address


NEW YORK and CHICAGO, March 12 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- At the Intel® Centrino(TM) mobile technology launch today in New York, Intel will highlight the benefits of their new mobile platform for the healthcare industry through a live demonstration of TouchWorks(TM), a product of Allscripts Healthcare Solutions (Nasdaq: MDRX - News). Don Caruso, M.D., Department Chair of Family Practice at Cheshire Medical Center/Dartmouth-Hitchcock Keene and recent winner of the 2003 Microsoft Healthcare Users Group Physician of the Year Award, will demonstrate how the TouchWorks modular electronic medical record (mEMR(TM)) will leverage the capabilities of Intel Centrino mobile technology to deliver Just Right, Just-in-Time Information® to physicians at the point of care.


Source:http://biz.yahoo.com/prnews/030312/cgw020_1.html
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C.M.Wilkerson, D.C.
www.MedicalTabletPC.com
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[url=http://www.digital-doc.com/C2/EMR.htm]TabletPCs in a Medical Environment[/url]

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